Auburn Magazine

For Auburn University alumni and friends

Auburn softball coach Clint Myers isn’t quite as flashy as some of his coaching colleagues on the Plains. He isn’t known for his trademark sweater vests. He doesn’t say “boom” when the Tigers make a great play. He’s never taken his shirt off, painted his body and mingled with fans in the student section. In fact, he’s a self-described “old, fat man” who rarely seems to show much emotion while ensconced down the third-base line during Auburn softball games, but who actually radiates intensity to those who know him best.v
By Mike Jernigan ’80 | Photography by Wade Rackley | Designed by Shannon Bryant-Hankes ’84, Typography by Elizabeth Hildreth ’16

Auburn softball coach Clint Myers isn’t quite as flashy as some of his coaching colleagues on the Plains. He isn’t known for his trademark sweater vests. He doesn’t say “boom” when the Tigers make a great play. He’s never taken his shirt off, painted his body and mingled with fans in the student section. In fact, he’s a self-described “old, fat man” who rarely seems to show much emotion while ensconced down the third-base line during Auburn softball games, but who actually radiates intensity to those who know him best.

In homes week of August 17.

Gretchen VanValkenburg '86

Moving Ahead and Making Plans

First and foremost, please allow me to express my gratitude to the association’s life members who accepted the Auburn Alumni Association’s $1 million challenge. Thanks to your generosity, a total of 58 new scholarship endowments will be established to provide lasting support for Auburn students. Additionally, many of you have joined for the first time, renewed your membership or have chosen to become life members. THANK YOU! Your participation is appreciated and makes a difference.

Canvas Scraps and Loose Yarn

Leanna Leithauser-Lesley has threaded her way into the world of art, creating work that has taken needlepoint from the hobby room into the realm of museum exhibitions.

Leithauser-Lesley ’83 began doing needlepoint as a child after watching her mother and grandmother practice the painstaking work of counted-thread embroidery, stitching intricate patterns by working yarn or thread into a stiff loose-woven canvas.

Surprise from the Skies

When 89-year old Buford Robinson ’52 of Opelika made a recent visit to the Auburn University Regional Airport, it almost brought him to tears. Jim Cook ’96 of Auburn, a local pilot, asked Buford and his wife, Pat ’53, to come to the airport for a surprise. Cook had asked a friend, Larry Kelley ’71, to stop at the airport on his way to an air show in Beaufort, S.C. Kelley, a pharmacy alumnus, happily obliged in order to show his B-25 Mitchell aircraft to Buford, who flew the bomber with the Army Air Corps—the forerunner of the U.S. Air Force—in the Pacific during World War II.

Cheers for Chutney

Wander down the condiments aisle of  your local supermarket and the variety of toppings and jams and jellies can be overwhelming. Rebecca Williamson ’00 thinks something is missing: chutney, a fruit or vegetable relish mixture often associated in the U.S. with Indian or South Asian cuisine.

Williamson knows it’s much, much more. She started Holmstead Fines in 2013, infusing her skills from training at Le Cordon Bleu in London and her Southern roots to create a twist on a foreign favorite.

Rural Studio might have drawn Brian FitzSimmons '97 to Auburn, but it was industrial design that kept him here—and eventually propelled him to the ultimate urban studio, putting his design chops to work in the world of Martha Stewart.
By Ashtyne Cole ’15 and Suzanne Johnson | Photography by Jeff Etheridge | Designed by Shannon Bryant-Hankes ’84

Rural Studio might have drawn Brian FitzSimmons to Auburn, but it was industrial design that kept him here—and eventually propelled him to the ultimate urban studio, putting his design chops to work in the world of Martha Stewart.”

Brian  FitzSimmons ’97 moved to New York City in August 2001, ready to take on the Big Apple in his position with the industrial design consulting firm of Barry David Berger + Associates. A month later, the events of 9/11 changed everything.

In homes week of August 17.

See the New Corner and Samford Park August 21

For Stories in Between Follow the Auburn Magazine Blog

Pitch Perfect

Jennifer Mayo, a junior in finance at Auburn University, just wanted to stay busy for the summer. Her attempt to fight through summer boredom and her love for the movie “Pitch Perfect” came together when she was cast as a feature extra in the movie “Pitch Perfect 2.”... read more

Auburn Opens New RFID Lab

Auburn University celebrated the grand opening of the radio frequency identification, or RFID, lab on Wednesday, May 20. RFID tags, when attached to items, can track items that can assist in marketing research and loss prevention. The tags use wireless systems to send... read more

Ace Atkins Beats the Odds

In the 1980 film Star Wars Episode V: The Empire Strikes Back, C-3PO tells Han Solo the likelihood of successfully navigating an asteroid field is around 3,720 to one. “Never tell me the odds,” Han Solo replies. It’s a line author Ace Atkins ’94 can relate to in... read more

Off the Beaten path

Chewacla State Park’s 700 acres of trails and creeks will soon be populated by college students looking for a place to take a break from fall classes. Located just south of Auburn Chewacla was established by U.S. President Franklin D. Roosevelt’s Civilian Conservation Corps in 1935.

Chewacla State Park
An online search to fill a fantasy-league roster led Michelle McKenna-Doyle '87 to the job of a lifetime as senior vice president and CIO for the National Football League. It was karma.
By Ashtyne Cole ’15 and Suzanne Johnson | Photography by Jeff Etheridge | Designed by Shannon Bryant-Hankes ’84

An online search to fill a fantasy-league roster led Michelle McKenna-Doyle to the job of a lifetime as senior vice president and CIO for the National Football League. It was karma.

Michelle McKenna-Doyle ’87 is accustomed to speaking in front of large crowds around the country on a regular basis in her position as senior vice president and chief information officer for the National Football League.

In homes week of August 17.

Bob Sanders and WAUD have been a part of life for generations of Auburn men and women since 1955—complete with barnyard animals, helicopter sound effects and music. Lots of music.
By George Littleton ’79 and Rheta Grimsley Johnson ’77 | Photography by Jeff Etheridge | Designed by Shannon Bryant-Hankes ’84

Bob Sanders and WAUD have been a part of life for generations of Auburn men and women since 1955—complete with barnyard animals, helicopter sound effects and music. Lots of music.

On April 1, 1955, change was challenging tradition in sleepy Auburn, Ala. Two separate singers had radio hits with “The Ballad of Davy Crockett,” but a few weeks later Bill Haley’s “Rock Around the Clock” hit No. 1 and changed everything. On the silver screen, James Dean and Marlon Brando were mumbling menacing messages. Shug Jordan’s Tigers were preparing for a four-year run of 34 wins against just five losses and two ties, including a national championship and four in a row over rivals Georgia and Alabama.

In homes week of August 17.

Exclusive video for Auburn Magazine

The Fish Farmer: The Story of Valentine Abe, Part 1

Flight School

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